iPhone 6 is flexible (not in a good way)

Now, it has been rumored that the upcoming Samsung Galaxy S6 and Note 4 are suppose feature a flexible display. Apple has taken flexible display to a whole new level with the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus (and not in a good way). Seems there is a bit of a design flaw with the aluminium construction.

Photos have begun appearing online showing distinctly bent aluminium devices, with complaints that the new iterations of the iPhone, which feature a thinner and larger aluminium body, are unable to stand up to the wear and tear of staying in a pocket.

via C|Net

Firefox 32.0.3 Released

Mozilla release an emergency update for Firefox 32.0 on September 24th, 2014 with Firefox 32.0.3. This release addressed these issues:

Please see the release notes for full details.

Depending on update settings, users will be prompted to update to version 32.0.3 or can do so via Help > About Firefox or going to getfirefox.com where they can download and manually install the latest version of Firefox. The next planned release will be Firefox 33 on October 14, 2014.

Change Firefox menu shortcuts with Menu Wizard

"Menu Wizard is a handy browser add-on for the Firefox web browser that you can use to hide or move menu items. It supports the Firefox menu bar (not displayed anymore by default), the tab and main context menu, and the bookmarks bar by default so that you can customize what is displayed and how it is displayed in the browser. ..."
Source: gHacks Tech News
More  Change Firefox menu shortcuts with Menu Wizard

Firefox 32.0.2 Released

Mozilla release an emergency update for Firefox 32.0 on September 18th, 2014 with Firefox 32.0.2. This release addressed these bugs:
  • Corrupt installations cause Firefox to crash on update
Please see the release notes for full details. Depending on update settings, users will be prompted to update to version 32.0.2 or can do so via Help > About Firefox or going to getfirefox.com where they can download and manually install the latest version of Firefox. The next planned release will be Firefox 33 on October 14, 2014.

Yet another reason I so dislike Apple products…

I've never been a fan of Apple products. They are over-priced and use proprietary parts and accessories. Yes their products are high quality. In the case of a phone or computer I figure the Apple brand is going to last the same amount of time as the non-Apple brand. So in that case I'd rather spend the money on getting more features (and be able to use third-party after-market parts and accessories). I have never owned a Mac, iPad, iPhone or even iPod (well, I did own an iPod touch for a couple days). I refuse to use iTunes, even though there are times I can get a song or entire album for free (and legally). I simply want to be able to download the song/album from a website without having to install special software (and all the bloatware/baggage associated with it such as QuickTime and Bonjour). I came across this article on C|Net: Why I'm done buying cheap Lightning cables, which gives me yet another reason I so dislike Apple products.
For as long as I can remember, I've championed cheap cables. Fifty bucks for six feet of HDMI cord?! Don't be silly; the $5 jobs are just as good. Same goes for optical, Ethernet, Micro-USB -- you name it. But Lightning cables? That's another story. Apple charges $19 and $29 for 3- and 6-foot versions, which is just plain ridiculous. Hit up Amazon or Ebay and you'll find five-packs selling for $6.99 out the door. That kind of discrepancy means this is just another case of the "Apple tax," right?
I have yet to have a micro-USB cable fail on me and I am not exactly gentle with them either. It is not like I abuse the cables, they just get handled a lot. For instances, the cable I use in my home office for my phone. I am unplugging/plugging the cable into/from the phone a several times a day and still works fine for the past year or so. Of course it is the cable that came with my Samsung Galaxy S4. However, it looks and feels like any other micro-USB cable. I also use micro-USB cables without any issues to charge my Nexus 7 tablet and even to charge a handheld Uniden scanner radio. The only time I've had to go out and buy a micro-USB cable was because I needed another (not to replace) cable. I needed one for a car charger after the first one failed (the charger itself not the hardwired micro-USB cable) and another one to keep in my backpack so if needed I could charge my phone other USB with my laptop while at school. A buddy of mine recently had issues with his Samsung Galaxy 3 not charging. He initially thought it was the micro-USB cable, until he tried a couple others without luck. Turns out the problem was with the charging port on his Galaxy 3 phone itself. So, why the high failure rate with cheap Lightning Cables? The conspiracy theory seems to be it is Apple's way of making sure you only buy their (over-priced) branded cables. It almost seems as if Apple has created a legal monopoly on Lightning Cables:
What's going on here? It's hard to say, because I've used countless dirt-cheap Micro-USB cables over the years and can't recall one of them ever going bad. When iOS 7 debuted last year, there were reports that some so-called knockoff Lightning cables suddenly stopped working -- suggesting Apple is working to prevent the cheap cables from, well, working. Indeed, if you shop around, you'll noticed that the more expensive Lightning cables are designated "MFi certified." This refers to Apple's licensing program, which requires developers and product makers to pay fees for that designation -- and pass that expense along to buyers.
Since I have never used a Lightning cable (Apple or otherwise) I can't really judge the validity of the article author's claim about non-Apple branded Lightning cables. As far as other (HDMI and Ethernet) 'cheap' cables go, they have worked just as well as the higher priced brand name (Monster) cables. Any Lighting cable users out there that care to share your experiences using these cables (either Apple or non-Apple branded? I am rather curious if the Apple branded Lightning cables end up failing and if so when?

Firefox 32 Download Security Feature/Annoyance

Now, for whatever reason I have not seen any reference to this new feature (or annoyance as Mozilla makes it rather difficult to allow the download if you understand the risks) in the Firefox 32.x release notes. From the Mozilla Security Blog:
Until recently, we only had access to lists of reported malicious web sites, now the Safe Browsing service monitors malicious downloaded files too. The latest version of Firefox (as of July 22) will protect you from more malware by comparing files you download against these lists of malicious files, and blocking them from infecting your system. The next version of Firefox (released in September) will prevent even more malicious downloads on Windows. When you download an application file, Firefox will verify the signature. If it is signed, Firefox then compares the signature with a list of known safe publishers. For files that are not identified by the lists as “safe” (allowed) or as “malware” (blocked), Firefox asks Google’s Safe Browsing service if the software is safe by sending it some of the download’s metadata. Note this online check will only be performed in Firefox on Windows for those downloaded files that don’t have a known good publisher. Most of the common and safe software for Windows is signed and so this final check won’t always need to happen.
Thanks to Claus (grand stream dreams) for bring this to my attention.

Firefox 32.0.1 Released

Mozilla release an emergency update for Firefox 32.0 on September 12th, 2014 with Firefox 32.0.1. This release addressed these bugs:
  • Stability issues for computers with multiple graphics cards
  • Mixed content icon may be incorrectly displayed instead of lock icon for SSL sites
  • WebRTC: setRemoteDescription() silently fails if no success callback is specified
Please see the release notes for full details. Depending on update settings, users will be prompted to update to version 32.0.1 or can do so via Help > About Firefox or going to getfirefox.com where they can download and manually install the latest version of Firefox. The next planned release will be Firefox 33 on October 14, 2014.

Tweeting Toilet

Yes, you read that correctly. An out of work electrical engineer with a background in computer science and a particular expertise in open source from Finland built a device which will send out Tweet every time the toilet is flushed.
The first reaction to the Twitter feed at @iotoilets may be a chuckle. But the idea behind this and what it illustrates is serious. It tracks water usage, offers a warning about the future of privacy in the era of the Internet of Things, and  just might say something about the modern job hunt. Ruecker built his device on a recent long weekend after he was laid off as an open-source evangelist at a technology company undergoing "rightsizing," as he put it. He lives in Finland and spoke to Computerworld via a video Skype session.
via ComputerWorld

iCups

You won't be able to run Firefox on these, not that you can on the iPhone. For those hoping that may be things would change with the upcoming iPhone 6, they are not. From Mozilla Support: "Apple's restrictions prevent us from bringing the current version of Firefox to iOS devices...". What it comes down to is Apple telling Mozilla they must use the Apple web engine (WebKit) in order to have a Firefox app on iOS. Simply put Apple is telling Mozilla you can have a Firefox app on iOS, but really it is going to be mobile Safari dressed up to look like Firefox. Or to put it another way it would be like Microsoft telling Mozilla, sure you can have Firefox for Windows, but it must use our Trident engine. Of course unlike Apple, Microsoft doesn't have restrictions in place on what can run on their operating system. Don’t have the money to shell out $800+ USD (£539) for the new iPhone 6 later this year? Don’t want to sign a 2-year contract with a carrier that will cost you more than the phone to get out of early? Not smart enough to use a Smart Phone? Worried that your phone is going to get hacked, lost/stolen, damaged or the NSA is listening in on your conversations? Then the iCups are for you!
The iCups are “pure communication.” They are two silver cups connected by a jaunty light-green string. This isn’t your childhood version of cups-on-a-string — actually, I lie. It is pretty much your childhood version of cups-on-a-string. But it’s so much more than that. The cups are crafted from high-quality paper. The arts-and-crafts string offers “superior sound quality,” a considerable upgrade over your mom’s garden twine. Run-time and stand-by time are eternal and you can handle most repairs yourself.
You can find out more about the iCups at their Kickstarter Page via: C|Net